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Korean Resource Center
Korean Resource Center 1 Pink-talk-bubble-tail
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Immigrant Korean American adults from the ages of 30 to 55 years residing in Los Angeles represent a notoriously hard-to-reach population. Most are Limited English Proficient, work long hours, and are unfamiliar with the voting process. At the same time, they care deeply about quality of life issues, especially education. Through a multi-touch strategy (mailers, phone banking, canvassing) that is amplified through Korean media coverage, KRC will turn out 5,000 unlikely voters in this age range. KRC has a proven track record in running culturally sensitive, bi-lingual voter turnout and vote by mail programs for unlikely voters. KRC has run programs to turn out elderly voters for six years, and now close to 50% of LA Korean seniors vote by mail. KRC has increased turnout by as much as 22.8% among unlikely voters in past elections. With the My Parents Vote for Our Future campaign, KRC will be able to target voters age 30-55 and expects that at least 5,000 unlikely voters turn out in 2012.

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Khmer Girls in Action
Khmer Girls in Action
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We are focusing on young voters and their families. Specifically, we are focusing on turning out Cambodian American votes in Long Beach. We seek to build power in the Cambodian American population in Long Beach and to increase the pool of frequent voters in our community. We also seek to train young voters and cultivate a culture of voting in our youth population so that they can commit themselves to becoming life time voters.

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Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles (CHIRLA)
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Since we began our electoral work, CHIRLA has always focused on new and infrequent voters in Los Angeles. These voters are not the typical voters that you see going out to vote every election cycle. For a variety of reasons, these community members often feel uncomfortable voting. For example, they may not fully understand the process, might have language barriers, or feel intimated by the whole experience. While many voter outreach campaigns are targeting the likely voters in our state, not many are talking to the new and infrequent voters. CHIRLA does. We take the time to explain the propositions, what’s at stake, to show them their polling location, or remind them to go out to vote. Founded in 1986, CHIRLA’s name recognition and credibility here in Los Angeles have helped turned infrequent voters to active, consistent voters by building a relationship with them year after year and marching with them to the polls. This year, we will use this same approach with voters across the state in places like the greater Central Valley where many immigrant voters work in agricultural fields, and in small suburban communities where many voters are often disregarded and ignored by big campaigns. We will be contacting 58,622 new and infrequent Latino immigrant voters, turning out 26,997 of them on Election Day but through funding from Turn on the Turn Out, that number could be even greater.

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Pacoima Beautiful
Pacoima Beautiful
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The community we would focus on for outreach would be portions of California Assembly District 39, which includes Sun Valley, Pacoima, Sylmar, and Arleta. Our voter targets will be new voters who just turned 18 years old from the local high schools we currently work in, predominantly Spanish speaking adult citizens in the community, and already registered unlikely young adult voters between 18 and 25 years old. Since its inception in 1995, Pacoima Beautiful has provided residents and youth with leadership development, skills training, environmental awareness, and civic learning. The result is a cadre of community leaders inspired to articulate important issues and a group of decision makers committed to positive change. Through the years, we have developed a solid relationship in the community that not only includes other community organizations, but community residents through extensive outreach and successful campaigns. For example: City of Los Angeles Redistricting Outreach - In December 2011 to March 2012, Pacoima Beautiful assisted the Los Angeles City Council Redistricting Commission (LACCRC) in outreaching to community members in Council Districts 2, 3, 6, 7 to attend the first round of public hearings to determine the new redistricting lines. Pacoima Beautiful was successful in bringing 400 residents to the meeting to express their interest in the new boundaries. PB also collected 510 community surveys with more input on their community of interest. Our outreach consisted of door to door, social media, attending community gatherings and meetings, and phone banking. Peoples Planning School –This program aims to educate community residents so they can be more effective participants and advocate in the planning process. The curriculum focuses on teaching residents what planning is, how and why it affects our community, and the importance of participating in it; the “who’s who” of key decision makers in this area and their roles and interests (such as the Community Redevelopment Agency, Department of City Planning, etc.); and overview of the General Plan and related elements and the update processes associated. The goal is to make residents more effective advocates and participants in advancing RENEW’s Complete Streets efforts, PLACE’s Pacoima Wash initiative, Clean Up Green UP Campaign and other programs. Pacoima Beautiful had over 35 participants in the first six month course. Clean Up Green Up - Pacoima Beautiful has partnered with 3 community organizations to launch the Clean Up Green Up campaign to increase awareness of the problem of Cumulative Impacts and address toxic hazards in our neighborhoods. We introduced legislation for the City of Los Angeles to develop a pilot program in Pacoima, Boyle Heights, and Wilmington as toxic hot spot areas to: Revitalize these neighborhoods using economic development strategies and financial and planning incentives to help existing businesses clean and green up and attract new green jobs; Prevent further pollution in existing toxic hot spots using traditional planning tools; and Reduce pollution through a heightened inspection and enforcement program. Pacoima Beautiful has we have collected over 1,000 support cards and have the endorsements from 51 community organizations and businesses. The voter turnout for registered voters in this area for the last elections in June was only 16%. With our outreach we hope to bring 1,000 more voters for the 2012 November elections.

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Koreatown Immigrant Workers Alliance (KIWA)
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Our outreach will target low-propensity voters in Koreatown, particularly Asian Pacific Americans and Latina/os. Koreatown is home to approximately 116,000 people, mostly comprised of immigrant working poor Korean and Latinos. Asian Pacific Americans are the fastest growing ethnic group in the U.S. and 600,000 new Asian American voters entered the electorate in 2008. Latinos comprise one-quarter of all eligible voters in California, with some 40 percent of Latinos in California that are eligible to vote. In 2012, KIWA launched its first large scale voter empowerment program, which seeks to increase turnout for the November 2012 elections. At the end of our program, we will have developed the KIWA Voter Council, contacted 1600 voters, and registered 300 voters. This follow-up program, “Ktown Vote”, will turn out approximately 300 unlikely voters from Koreatown and the surrounding areas.

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Alliance of Californians for Community Empowerment (ACCE)
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Central and South LA have historically been home to thousands of new and unlikely voters. While the multiple and complex issues impacting the area have created a challenge to consistently high voter turnout, one group of voters and potential voters is often ignored: students - and particularly community college students. These voters often grew up and continue to live in the area around their college. Recent dramatic and negative developments impacting community college funding have resulted in unprecedented activism by students but these developments have not yet translated into a measurable increase in civic engagement. Student Tipping Point intends to build on existing neighborhood-based voter mobilization efforts in Central and South LA by conducting an intensive recruitment, leadership development, and GOTV effort with community college students. ACCE's organizing staff and members have extensive experience with voter engagement targeting unlikely voters, including over ten years of intensive voter ID and GOTV efforts in over 100 Central and South LA precincts. ACCE works between election cycles to develop the leadership and capacity of motivated community members. This work has resulted in over 75,000 voter contacts and 5000 total volunteers over ten years, with a strong precinct-based turnout system. For the November 2012 election ACCE plans to turn out 1000 unlikely voters through Student Tipping Point, and 10,000 total unlikely voters.

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Black Women for Wellness
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BWW will outreach to youth under the radar and off the grid focusing with at least four different audiences of primarily urban African American and Black women ages 18 – 35 who fit the following demographics: 1.Young people terming out of the foster children program, living in group homes or apartment complexes operated by foster youth serving agencies, in programs serving youth formerly within the foster care systems 2. Young women enrolled in trade school (beauty/nail technicians/culinary etc), continuation, GED programs, community colleges and job readiness programs 3. Youth and women involved with re entry programs, domestic violence shelters or other social living situation caused by financial/economic challenges and 4. Young women patronizing beauty, barber, nail salons and spas in South Los Angeles BWW participated with the Campaign for Teen Safety, successfully fighting 3 propositions on 3 different California ballots written to eliminate access to abortion for teens in CA. BWW will register 100 new voters with funding from Good as a specifically targeted audience to track via the www.bwwla.turbovote.org website and follow up for continued engagement leading up to at minimum the June 2013 Los Angeles mayoral election

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API Equality-LA
API Equality-LA
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We are focusing on young voters (primarily 18-24) in Asian American and Pacific Islander communities (API) in LA County. The API community is the fastest growing racial population group in the U.S. (Census 2010). API voters are the second largest voter bloc in California; a large proportion of voters reside in LA County and Southern CA. LA County alone has the highest API population in the US, numbering 1,539,030. – higher than any state in the nation. In 2010, eligible voters in Asian American and Pacific Islander communities are registered at markedly low percentages compared to the rest of California's population. Just 49.4% of eligible API voters are registered compared to 79% of the general population. Additionally voter turn-out is relatively lower among youth voters at just 9%. At the same young API voters are shown to vote largely in favor of LGBT equality and are supportive of other important community issues. We are focusing on this population in the short and long term to build a sustainable base of voters who will vote based on progressive, social justice values. We have conducted phone banks targeting Asian voters in the past, focusing primarily on the Chinese community. We have expertise in reaching out to various API ethnic communities, in collaboration with allies and other community groups. Between now and Election Day 2012, we plan to register 1720 new voters and turn out 2740 voters, my mobilizing approximately 80 additional volunteers.

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LA Human Right to Housing Collective
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The Collective works from Boyle Heights to Venice Beach, from the Harbor to the Northeast Valley, with a strong core in Central LA. The Collective's electoral turnout program focuses on moving residents of public housing, Section 8 housing, rent-controlled apartments and people experiencing homelessness to the polls. We currently have robust organizing clusters in the San Fernando Gardens, Mar Vista Gardens, William Mead, Pueblo del Rio, Ramona Gardens, Estrada Courts and Pico Gardens public housing communities -- over 3,000 apartments. We work specifically in the Downtown, Boyle Heights and Venice areas of Los Angeles to mobilize rent-controlled and Section 8 tenant voters, and the homeless. We've proven we can do this. When greedy landlords and corporations tried to pass Proposition 98 in 2008, they were counting on a low-turnout June election to help make rent control illegal in CA. Our Collective boosted turnout considerably in the areas where we work. For example, average turnout in LA for Prop. 98 was less than 15%, but in the 90291 Venice area where we organize over 20% of voters turned out. We defeated Prop. 98 handily, so we know we can do this. In November's election we're going to focus on turning out residents in areas where we already organize -- 7 of LA's 15 large public housing developments encompassing over 3,000 households; and in Boyle Heights, Venice and Downtown. We will turn out 2,000 public housing voters and 1,500 more neighborhood voters.

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Latino Equality Alliance (LEA)
Latino Equality Alliance (LEA)
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The Voters Not Victims campaign will focus on South East Los Angeles residents which are predominantly low-income, working class Latino individuals. Within these communities there will be efforts to include marginalized communities – LGBT/immigrant communities – and provide opportunities for voter engagement. LEA began as an effort to combat California’s Proposition 8 through the NO on 8 campaign. LEA opened a campaign office in East LA from which voter outreach / media outreach events originated which included a grand opening, women's event and even an election eve wedding! LEA ran its campaign phone bank and door-to-door electioneering efforts from this office and engaged in GOTV on Election Day. LEA secured the services of a campaign office manager who worked the community organizing efforts to get volunteers to the phone banks, etc. LEA also used this as HQ for community outreach and visibility actions. The East LA community organizations and people came to work together! It was the first "openly gay" voter outreach in East LA. For the Voters Not Victims campaign each high school will be challenged to reach 100 households/families throughout their communities; therefore we anticipate targeting and turning out 150-300 households for the upcoming election and challenging that turnout by doubling the target in future elections.

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Housing Long Beach 3 Pink-talk-bubble-tail
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Long Beach, CA is considered one of the most diverse cities in the nation. The City of Long Beach’s residents include: 40.8% Latino residents; 29.4% Caucasian residents; 13% African American residents; 0.3% American Indian and Alaska Native residents; 12.6% Asian residents; 1.1% Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander residents; and 3.0% Other residents. Additionally, Long Beach’s Community Profile states that of the City’s total population of 462,257 residents, 86,809 of the City’s residents, or 19.1% of the City’s population, live below the poverty line, as compared to the national average of 12.6% Our target audience is those who are most impacted by the challenges of our city - crime, foreclosures, poverty and more - yet are underrepresented in civic engagement and through voting. The city’s 1, 2 and 6th districts, which are primarily low-income and communities of color, are severely underrepresented. With turnout just over 10%, these are communities who have the greatest need and many times the least resources. Housing Long Beach works to empower these residents to have a voice through voting and will connect it to the ongoing organizing and civic engagement work that we do throughout the year. Of the 10,000 voters engaged through our efforts, we will turn out 2000 new and unlikely voters.

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Award_topvotedidea
$10,000
Circle-1-inactive Step1-title-idea-inactive

Submission Began
Monday, September 10

Submission Ended
Friday, September 28
at 12:00 PM PDT

Circle-2-inactive Step2-title-voting-inactive

Voting Began
Monday, October 01

Voting Ended
Monday, October 15
at 11:59 PM PDT

Circle-3 Step3-title
Korean Resource Center
Korean Resource Center

Winner Announced
Monday, October 22

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